14 Cards Your Anxious Friends Would Honestly Appreciate

1. A card when you did the ultimate act of betrayal: 

For when you committed the ultimate act of betrayal:

2. A card substituted as coupon:A stack of these very important coupons:

3.Because they need to know that they are great:Because sometimes they need a reminder:

4. The ultimate best invitation he/she will truly appreciate:The best kind of invitation:

5. For making him/her feel anxious by waiting:For inducing the least amount of texting anxiety possible:

6. To help them calm their hyperactive mind:To calm their overactive mind:

7. For not underestimating what they are actually going through in their lives:For not downplaying what they're going through:

8. Because real surprises are certainly not a good idea (and it SUCKS):Because real surprises actually SUCK:

9. When you just can’t say the right words:Some brutally honest condolences:

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7 Powerful Illustrations That Will Show How People Treat Mental Illness Vs. How They Treat Physical Illness

So how do people treat their physical and mental health disorders? Firstly, Melancholia and hysteria are considered as mental illnesses. The said illnesses do not present themselves on the surface like a broken leg. Because of this, problems are brushed under the carpet and not viewed in the same light. It is very important that we should be understanding and considerate towards the sufferers of this condition. Just because the pain is not physically visible, it does not mean that they are not suffering inside.

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This Student Took Disturbing Images To Show What Anxiety Feels Like

Katie Joy Crawford, 23, is a photography student in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.Meet Katie Joy Crawford, a 23-year-old photography student based in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

katiejoycrawford.com / Via Twitter: @ktjoy326

She decided to create a photo series of her experiences with depression and anxiety for her senior thesis. Her thesis, “My Anxious Heart,” had 12 self-portraits detailing the crippling effect of the mental illness. She spent three hours for each shot and used a camera remote to capture the photos.

“It quickly became a cathartic experience for me that has led to such healing and self-discovery,” Crawford told BuzzFeed. “I want those that suffer to feel like they have a voice and a hand to hold. I never want anyone to feel alone, as anxiety and depression can be isolating on its own.”

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